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Travel information essentials

The Information displayed here covers the essentials of travelling to Superior Country, specifically from the United States. We aim to make as much information available to help you organize your trip.

However, as is the nature of government and the internet, everything can change.

FOR OFFICIAL INFORMATION PLEASE CHECK
THIS SITE

or call Border Services Canada at 1-204-983-3500 or 1-506-636-5064

Disclaimer: We make every effort to ensure accuracy of the information published but cannot be held responsible for the information provided herein. The information contained in this book is offered to you as a matter of interest and is believed to be correct and accurate at the time of printing. The producers of this publication accept no liability for errors or omissions.

At the Border

CROSSING THE CANADA-U.S. BORDER

CROSSING THE CANADA-U.S. BORDER
All U.S. citizens aged 16 and older, entering Canada by air (including in-transit passengers who are transferring planes in the U.S.), land or water, must present one of the following documents: a passport or passport card; an Enhanced Driver’s License; or a Trusted Traveler Program Card (SENTRI, NEXUS or FAST Card).

Travellers aged 15 and under require a birth certificate for land or sea travel and a passport for air travel. For current requirements go to: cic.gc.ca.
If you are traveling with your own children under the age of 16 and your spouse, bring their birth certificates. If you are traveling with a child other than your own or without your spouse, have the child’s birth certificate along with a letter of permission, including name and contact information for that child’s parents/guardians or your spouse. This is needed in case Customs officers decide to verify you have permission to bring the child into Canada.
Visitors from all other countries require a valid passport and, in some cases, a visitor’s visa. Starting March 15, 2016, visa-exempt foreign nationals who fly to or transit through Canada will need an Electronic Travel Authorization (ETA). Exceptions include U.S. citizens and travellers with a valid visa. For more information:

Canada Border Services Agency:
cbsa.gc.ca
Within Canada: 1-800-461-9999
TTY Within Canada: 1-866-335-3237
Outside of Canada: 204-983-3500

U.S. Customs and Border Protection
cbp.gov or getyouhome.gov
Within the U.S.: 1-877-CBP-5511
TTY Within the U.S.: 1-866-6582
Outside of the U.S.: (202) 325-8000
Grand Portage, MN Port of Entry: (218) 475-2244

Frequently asked questions:
www.canadawelcomesyou.net
www.travel.state.gov

IMPORTANT NOTICE FOR U.S. RESIDENTS
If you or anyone in your party has a felony or misdemeanor conviction, you may not be allowed into Canada. This includes such offences as a DUI. Your admissibility to Canada depends on the nature of the offence, how many offences you have, as well as how long ago it occurred. If this applies to you or someone traveling with you, it is imperative you contact Immigration Canada well in advance of your arrival. You will likely have to complete some paperwork and Immigration Canada authorities will then advise you of the likelihood of being allowed into Canada. Final determination of your admissibility into Canada is only made when you cross the border.
Contact Citizenship and Immigration Canada at www.cic.gc.ca/english/visit/tourist.asp or the Canadian Consulate in New York, NY / regarding any forms you may be required to fill out. You may also wish to call an Immigration Officer at the Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario Port of Entry to discuss your situation at 1-800-461-9999 or 1-204-983-3500 (calls outside of Canada). Frequently asked questions for Americans traveling outside of the U.S. are available on these two websites: www.canadawelcomesyou.net or www.travel.state.gov

 

WHAT CAN & CAN’T COME INTO CANADA

Residents of the United States who visit Canada are allowed to bring in a “reasonable” amount
of personal goods duty free. The amount you bring should align with your length of stay. Limits for
some of the regulated items:

  • Alcohol: If you are 19 years of age or older and crossing the border into Ontario, you can bring,
    free of duty and taxes, either 1.5 litres (50 oz.) of wine, 1.14 litres (40 oz.) of liquor, or 24 X
    355 millilitres (12 oz.) of beer or ale. If you bring in more than the amount listed here, you will
    be required to pay the duty at the Border on excess amounts. Make sure you fully declare all
    alcohol in your possession.
  •  Tobacco: If you are 19 years of age or older and crossing the border into Ontario, you are
    allowed to bring, free of duty, up to 200 cigarettes, 50 cigars, 200 grams (7 oz.) of manufactured
    tobacco and 200 tobacco sticks. You may bring additional quantities but you will be required to pay
    duties and taxes on the excess amounts.
  • Food Products: What is and what is not allowed changes frequently, visit www.inspection.gc.ca for
    current information prior to your departure.

Pets: Dogs and cats accompanying their owners from the U.S. must have current (within 36 months)
rabies vaccination certificates. Owners from other countries who wish to bring their pets with them
should contact 1-800-442-2342 / 1-613-225-2342 / TTY 1- 800-465-7735 or visit www.inspection.gc.ca

RESIDENTS RETURNING TO THE UNITED STATES
Provided you were in Canada for a minimum of 48 hours, you are allowed to bring back duty free:

  • $400 U.S. worth of merchandise per person every 30 days. Families may combine their $400
    exemptions
  • $200 U.S. per person if you have stayed less than 48 hours.
  • Refer to www.cbp.gov for more information
Vehicles and insurance

VEHICLES AND INSURANCE
Any necessary permits are issued at the port of entry. If you’ve rented a vehicle or trailer, make sure you bring along a copy of the rental contract, which stipulates that you have permission to use it in Canada. U.S. motorists planning to travel in Canada are advised to obtain a Canadian Non-Resident Interprovincial Motor Vehicle Liability Insurance Card available only in the U.S.
Contact your local insurance agency. For more information contact Canadian Border Services (204) 983-3500, or (506) 636-5064, or visit the website at www.cbsa.gc.ca.

SEAT BELTS
Ontario Law requires that adults and children over 40lbs/18kg in weight wear seat belts. Infants from birth to 20lbs/9kg in weight must travel in a rear-facing child restraint system. Toddlers weighting 20-40lbs /9-18kg must travel in a front-facing child restraint seat.

Hospitals and Health Insurance

Most communities have hospitals and/or resident doctors. Wise travelers will check with their medical service plans to ensure they will be covered while in Canada, as health insurance plan may not extend coverage outside your country of residence.

If you are taking prescription drugs, make sure that they are in the original packaging, bring an adequate supply, and bring a copy of the prescription in case you need a refill during your stay in Ontario.

If this is not possible, carry a copy of the prescription or a letter from your doctor. For more information and insurance details, contact your travel agent, insurance broker, or your employer’s insurance provider.

CREDIT CARDS, FINANCIAL SERVICES AND U.S. FUNDS

Chartered banks are located in virtually all cities and towns. These full-service institutions are the best locations for exchanging currency. There is also a government sanctioned Canada / U.S. currency exchange service at the Ontario Travel Information Centre in Sault Ste. Marie and at the Duty Free Store & Kiosk. Credit cards such as Visa, MasterCard and AMEX, are generally honoured in all communities. Be sure to check with individual businesses before or when booking accommodations to ensure they accept your type of card.

SALES TAX
In Ontario, a Harmonized Sales Tax (HST) of 13% applies to most purchases.
For more information, contact:
• 1-800-565-9353 (inside Canada);
• 1-902-432-5604 (outside Canada); or
www.cra-arc.gc.ca

CURRENCY
If you want to know what your money is worth in Canada, visit www.bankofcanada.ca/rates/exchange/daily-converter/ to quickly convert your currency to Canadian dollars.

STATUTORY HOLIDAYS

In Ontario, it’s important to plan ahead for the following holidays and booking ahead for accommodations during these holidays is recommended:
New Year’s Day January 1
Family Day Third Monday in February
Good Friday Friday before Easter Sunday
Easter Sunday Retail stores not open
Easter Monday Governmental Only
Victoria Day Monday before May 25
Canada Day July 1
Civic Holiday First Monday in August (not statutory)
Labour Day First Monday in September
Thanksgiving Day Second Monday in October
Christmas Day December 25
Boxing Day December 26

Crossing the Border with a DUI

Drunk driving offences of any kind are dealt with very differently in Canada. Many US Visitors have been denied entry based if they have any kind of alcohol related offense. It does not matter if you are a passenger, driver or even walking. It does not matter what classification you offense was, nor how long ago it was. US President Bush was required to get a waiver to enter Canada based on a 1976 drunk driving offense.

To cross the border into Canada you must file for a Temporary Resident Permit  (TRP) or file for Rehabilitation if the crime is older than 5 years. TRP will allow you into Canada for a single trip, Rehabilitation removes the issue completely as long as you do not re-offend.

ONTARIO PROVINCIAL POLICE (OPP)

For police services anywhere in Ontario, call the 24-hour toll-free line 1-888-310-1122 or 1-888-310-1133 (TTY).

LIQUOR OUTLETS AND THE LAW

You must be 19 or over to buy or consume liquor, wine and beer in Ontario. It is an offence to consume alcohol anywhere other than in a licensed establishment, your residence or within a reasonable distance of your residence. Ontario laws prohibit having open bottles of liquor in a location accessible to the driver of a vehicle. Please don’t drink and drive! Liquor including wine and beer, is available through stores run by the Liquor Control Board of Ontario (LCBO) or in smaller centers, by their authorized representative. Beer may also be purchased through “The Beer Store” or directly from brewery outlets. Beer, wine and cider is now available at select grocery stores in the province of Ontario.
Drinking hours in licensed establishments are from 11 a.m. until 2 a.m. In Ontario, it is an offence to consume alcohol anywhere other than in a residence or on licensed premises. Please note that driving motorized vehicles, including cars, trucks, All Terrain Vehicles (ATVs), snowmobiles, and boats, while impaired is illegal. You can immediately lose your license for 90 days for refusing to take a breathalyzer reading greater than 80 mg (0.08%) of alcohol per 100 mL of blood. Charges may be laid under the criminal code of Canada.

BOATERS - HOW TO REPORT YOUR ENTRY

Pleasure crafts may enter Canada by trailer or under their own power. All boats powered by motors 10 HP or over must be licensed. Boat licenses from outside Ontario are accepted. Operator Competency Requirements for Pleasure Craft – Regulation requires that all operators of motorized pleasure crafts have proof of competency and proof of age on board at all times. An operator card or equivalent, issued to a non-resident by their state or country, will be considered as proof of competency. For information visit www.safeboater.com
Planning to “land” your vessel on Canadian soil or did you leave Canadian waters and land on U.S. soil? All private boaters who intend to land on Canadian soil, or who have departed Canadian waters and landed on U.S. soil, are required to report to a CBSA designated marine reporting site. Upon arrival at this designated site, call the Telephone Reporting Centre at 1-
888-226-7277 from the phone provided to obtain clearance. Not planning to “land” your vessel or did you leave Canadian waters but did not land on U.S. soil? You still need to report to the CBSA. Certain private boaters may contact the CBSA by calling the TRC at 1-888-226-7277.

For more detailed information, visit www.cbsa.gc.ca/media/facts-faits/096-eng.html

 

Border Points of Superior Country

The Border Information Service (BIS) is an automated telephone service that answers incoming calls and provides general information on CBSA programs, services and initiatives through recorded scripts.

Service in English or French

Calls within Canada

Toll-free
1-800-461-9999

Calls outside Canada

Long distance charges apply
1-204-983-3500
1-506-636-5064

TTY within Canada

For those with hearing or speech impairments
1-866-335-3237

The crossing points

Rainy River
The Baudette – Rainy River International Bridge
connects Highway 11 in Ontario with Minnesota State Highway 72 and Minnesota and is the most western border crossing in Ontario.

Real time border crossing information >>


 

Fort Francis
International Falls / Fort Frances Border Crossing – US Hwy 53, US 71 / ON 71, Church Street

Real time border crossing information >>


 

Pigeon River
The Pigeon River International Bridge south-west of Thunder Bay connects Ontario’s Highway 61 with Highway 61 in Grand Portage, Minnesota.

Real time border crossing information >>


 

Sault Ste. Marie
The Sault Ste. Marie International Bridge
connects Huron Street in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, with Interstate 75 in Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan.

In 2012, nearly 1.9 million passenger cars and more than 100,000 trucks, buses and other commercial vehicles used the bridge.

FAST/NEXUS is not available at this crossing.

Real time border crossing information >>

 

Remote Border Crossing

The Remote border clearance process allows for individuals to cross the border into Canada in remote areas. Typically in Superior Country this allows for boats visiting Canada on Lake Superior legal access across the border throughout the Lake.

This will also allow for seamless crossing of the border within our shared Park boundaries and other fishing lakes located in Both Countries.

Travelling with Youth

Youth under 18 travelling alone will need a letter a letter of permission from a parent or legal guardian.

Children under 16 should also have a valid Passport and must be travelling in the same vehicle as their parents or guardians.

It is good practice if a child is travelling with only one parent that a letter of consent from the other parent is obtained if possible as entry is at the discretion of the border officer. – There is no legal requirement for this.

Bringing a pet

You can bring your favorite non-human family member on vacation to Canada provided you have a proper rabies vaccination certificate provided by a licensed veterinarian. There are plenty of places in Superior Country that allow pets however its always good to call ahead.

Declaring Goods

When arriving in Canada you must, by Canadian law, report to a BSO, answer all questions truthfully, and accurately report your goods. This means you must also report any food, plant and animal products in your possession.

Have all required identification and travel documents in hand. Be ready to make a full and accurate declaration, including the amount of goods in Canadian dollars you are bringing with you. This will help us get you on your way as quickly as possible.

Arriving by air: If you are arriving by air, you will receive a CBSA Declaration Card while you are onboard your flight. You must complete it before arriving in Canada. For a step-by-step guide, consult Arriving by Air or check out our video on YouTube.

Arriving by land: If you are arriving by land, follow the signs to the first checkpoint. A BSO will check your identification and other travel documents and you will answer their questions.

Arriving by private boat: If you are arriving by private boat, go directly to a designated marine telephone reporting site and call the Telephone Reporting Center (TRC) at 1-888-226-7277 to get CBSA clearance. Certain private boaters may now report to the CBSA by calling the TRC from their cellular telephones from the location at which they enter Canadian waters. For more information, visit the Private boaters page.

CBSA Declaration Card

The CBSA Declaration Card tells us what we need to know about you, your travels and what you are bringing into the country. CBSA Declaration Cards are given to passengers arriving by air, and are also used at some locations for travellers arriving by train, boat and bus. Bring a pen in your carry-on baggage to complete the card before you arrive.

Instructions on how to complete the card are attached to the form. You can list up to four people living at the same residence on one card. If there are more than four people living at your address use one additional card for each additional group of four or fewer people. Once the cards are complete you can detach and discard the instructions. Do not fold the card.

Be sure to keep the card handy along with your identification and other travel documents. You will be asked to show this card to our BSOs several times.

If you have any questions about the card or Canadian regulations, ask the BSO when you arrive.

Auto and Towing Regulations

Towing More Than One Vehicle

Cars, passenger vans and SUVs are not permitted to tow more than one trailer or one vehicle. Motor homes, trucks, pickup trucks and truck campers are legally permitted to tow two trailers or a trailer and a motor vehicle behind a trailer. However, a three vehicle combination that is swaying excessively, is unstable or has reduced handling capabilities is subject to action by the police as an unsafe combination of vehicles under the Highway Traffic Act.

The maximum length of any combination of vehicles is 23 m (75′ 6″).

Source >>

Fishing

Where can you get a fishing license?

Always Consult the current regulation handbook located here.

Under 18 you do not need a fishing license or outdoors card. You do need to be accompanied by someone who holds a valid outdoors card and fishing license.

For over 18

1 Day sport fishing license: $23.01 (Does not require an outdoors card)

The following require an outdoors card as well ($9.68)

8 Day sport fishing license: $53.54 ($30.53 for conservation license)

1 Year sport fishing license: $83.27 ($51.65 for conservation license)

3 Year sport fishing license: $249.81 ($154.96 for conservation license)

Fishing Licenses can be purchased online here, at participating Service Canada locations or at local authorized license dealers throughout Superior Country.

Fishing Regulations

FISHING REGULATIONS
 Licenses: All non-residents of Canada who want to fish in Ontario require a current non-resident sports fishing license and a non-resident Outdoors Card. Non-residents under the age of 18 may fish without a license if accompanied by a licensed family member. Any fish caught are part of the limit of the person with the license. Canadian residents require a resident fishing license and a current resident Outdoors Card.
Bait: You cannot bring live minnows, smelts, leeches or any other bait fish into Ontario from the United States. Night crawlers are allowed but they must be brought in containers with artificial bedding only.

Limits and Regulations: With countless lakes and streams, it is important that anglers are aware of the general regulations and of any exceptions to the general regulations (e.g. specific slots or catch and possession limits) that may apply to the lake you will be fishing. Ontario’s Fishing Regulations can be downloaded at www.ontario.ca/travel-and-recreation/fishing

What Bait can you bring?

It is illegal to bring any live bait into Canada. You can bring live worms into Canada as long as they are in non-soil based bedding.

What can you fish for?

Superior Country has numerous fish species sought after by anglers. Walleye, Northern Pike, Muskie, Smallmouth bass, Lake Trout, Brook Trout, Steelhead, Chinook Salmon, Coho Salmon, Pink Salmon, Perch, Lake Whitefish, Lake Cisco, Burbot and even Carp.

What you are allowed to take back

You are allowed to bring back to the USA from your Superior Country fishing trip the fish allowed under Ontario possession limits which vary from species to species. Fish must be packaged for travel and easily identifiable as to the species. A one inch square skin tag must be left on any fillets being transported.

Consult your Fishing Regulation Handbook for possession limits and pay particular attention to combined possession limits (like trout species).

Invasive Species

IN16_fbad_fishing-01

Invasive Species are on the rise in our Lakes – but boaters can help stop them

You may be surprised to learn that just taking your boat out for a spin on a neighbouring lake can help spread harmful invasive species. And that these invaders – left unchecked – can seriously harm your favorite lakes and rivers.

Fish, plants or invertebrates can be spread by humans – either on purpose or by accident – to new areas of the province. These species can become invasive, causing harm to the environment and the economy. In fact, in Ontario, the impacts from zebra mussels alone cost between $75 million and $91 million per year.

And the presence of invasive species means fewer of the types of fish you like to catch, since invasive often compete with native species, taking away their food and space or introducing parasites and diseases that harm native fish and other species.

When invasive species are introduced and get established, their numbers can increase rapidly.  Some invasive species that have already invaded Canadian waters include: zebra mussels (mussel), round goby (fish), spiny water flea (invertebrate), Eurasian watermilfoil (aquatic plant) and the rusty crayfish.

Invasive species are among the leading causes of native fish and other aquatic species being threatened or endangered, and they negatively affect global biodiversity, economies and human health around the world.

How to stop the spread of these invaders

Here are five steps boaters can take to make sure they are not spreading invasive species to new areas:

  1. Inspect your boat, motor, trailer, and boating equipment (anchors and fishing gear, centerboards, rollers and axles). Remove any zebra mussels and other animals and plants that are visible before leaving any water body.
  2. Drain water from the motor, live well, bilge and transom before leaving any water body.
  3. Wash or dry your boat, tackle, downriggers, trailer, and other boating equipment to kill harmful species that were not visible at the boat launch. Some aquatic species can survive out of water for long periods of time. Therefore, it is important to either:
  • Rinse your boat and equipment that normally gets wet with hot tap water (greater than 50°C), or
  • Spray your boat and trailer with high pressure water (>250 psi), or
  • Dry your boat and equipment in the sun for at least five days before transporting them to another body of water.
  1. Empty your bait bucket on land 30 metres away from the water. Never release bait into water, or release aquatic animals from one water body into another. It is illegal to use gobies, ruffe or rudd for bait.
  2. You can report sightings of invasive species by calling the Invading Species Hotline at 1-800-563-7711 or by emailing info@invadingspecies.com. You can also use the EDDMapS Ontario system to report sightings through your computer or smartphone.

Join in the fight against invasive species and protect your great outdoors. Learn more at Ontario.ca/InvasionON.

 

GOOD BETTER BEST
Clean, Drain Clean, Drain, Dry Clean, Drain, Disinfect
ü Clean off all visible mud, vegetation and other debrisü Pull and store the Drain plug, lower your outboard to drain standing water and drain live wells before leaving the launch In addition to cleaning and draining:ü Dry your boat and equipment in hot or sunny weather for 2-7 days before transporting them to another body of water

 

ü Use a pressure washer to spray off your boat and trailer (250psi) OR rinse off your boat and trailer with hot water (greater than 50°C)ü To prevent the spread of viral hemorrhagic septicemia, rinse live wells with 10% household bleach/water solution (i.e. 100ml of bleach to 1L water). Rinse well with water to remove any residual chlorine

Hunting

Hunting Regulations

Non-residents must have one of the following to obtain a hunting license:
1) An Ontario non-resident hunting license issued to you after January 1, 1968.
2) A hunting license issued to you after January 1, 1968 by a competent authority in a jurisdiction where you were a resident of that jurisdiction.
3) An Ontario hunting license verification certificate showing your license to hunt in Ontario or that you passed the hunting license examination.

Visit www.ontario.ca/travel-and-recreation/hunting or call the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources at 1-800-667-1940 for further information.

Fire Arm Regulations

Residents of the U.S. over the age of 18 may bring a hunting rifle or shotgun into Ontario for hunting purposes. You are also allowed to bring up to 200 rounds of ammunition duty free, or up to 1,500 rounds for use at a recognized competition. Firearms are subject to a registration fee. It is suggested that you contact the Canada Firearms Centre For information before you attempt to import a firearm.

Residents of the U.S. are encouraged to pre-register their firearms prior arriving. Handguns, fully automatic weapons, modified weapons, stun guns, mace and other weapons are not allowed in Canada. Proper storage of the firearm is important so make sure you are aware of the regulations. Of special note, firearms of any kind are forbidden in many of Canada’s National and Provincial Parks and adjacent areas.

For more information on importing your firearm into Canada and to receive a registration form, please contact the Canadian Firearms Centre at 800-731-4000 or 506-624-5380.

Hunting liscenses and draws

Hunting liscenses and draws

What you are allowed to bring
What you are allowed to take back
Invasive Species

IN16_fbad_fishing-01

Invasive Species are on the rise in our Lakes – but boaters can help stop them

You may be surprised to learn that just taking your boat out for a spin on a neighbouring lake can help spread harmful invasive species. And that these invaders – left unchecked – can seriously harm your favorite lakes and rivers.

Fish, plants or invertebrates can be spread by humans – either on purpose or by accident – to new areas of the province. These species can become invasive, causing harm to the environment and the economy. In fact, in Ontario, the impacts from zebra mussels alone cost between $75 million and $91 million per year.

And the presence of invasive species means fewer of the types of fish you like to catch, since invasive often compete with native species, taking away their food and space or introducing parasites and diseases that harm native fish and other species.

When invasive species are introduced and get established, their numbers can increase rapidly.  Some invasive species that have already invaded Canadian waters include: zebra mussels (mussel), round goby (fish), spiny water flea (invertebrate), Eurasian watermilfoil (aquatic plant) and the rusty crayfish.

Invasive species are among the leading causes of native fish and other aquatic species being threatened or endangered, and they negatively affect global biodiversity, economies and human health around the world.

How to stop the spread of these invaders

Here are five steps boaters can take to make sure they are not spreading invasive species to new areas:

  1. Inspect your boat, motor, trailer, and boating equipment (anchors and fishing gear, centerboards, rollers and axles). Remove any zebra mussels and other animals and plants that are visible before leaving any water body.
  2. Drain water from the motor, live well, bilge and transom before leaving any water body.
  3. Wash or dry your boat, tackle, downriggers, trailer, and other boating equipment to kill harmful species that were not visible at the boat launch. Some aquatic species can survive out of water for long periods of time. Therefore, it is important to either:
  • Rinse your boat and equipment that normally gets wet with hot tap water (greater than 50°C), or
  • Spray your boat and trailer with high pressure water (>250 psi), or
  • Dry your boat and equipment in the sun for at least five days before transporting them to another body of water.
  1. Empty your bait bucket on land 30 metres away from the water. Never release bait into water, or release aquatic animals from one water body into another. It is illegal to use gobies, ruffe or rudd for bait.
  2. You can report sightings of invasive species by calling the Invading Species Hotline at 1-800-563-7711 or by emailing info@invadingspecies.com. You can also use the EDDMapS Ontario system to report sightings through your computer or smartphone.

Join in the fight against invasive species and protect your great outdoors. Learn more at Ontario.ca/InvasionON.

 

GOOD BETTER BEST
Clean, Drain Clean, Drain, Dry Clean, Drain, Disinfect
ü Clean off all visible mud, vegetation and other debrisü Pull and store the Drain plug, lower your outboard to drain standing water and drain live wells before leaving the launch In addition to cleaning and draining:ü Dry your boat and equipment in hot or sunny weather for 2-7 days before transporting them to another body of water

 

ü Use a pressure washer to spray off your boat and trailer (250psi) OR rinse off your boat and trailer with hot water (greater than 50°C)ü To prevent the spread of viral hemorrhagic septicemia, rinse live wells with 10% household bleach/water solution (i.e. 100ml of bleach to 1L water). Rinse well with water to remove any residual chlorine

Camping

Crown Land Camping Permits

None-Canadian citizens are required to purchase a crown land camping permit if camping on non-prohibited crown land in Superior Country. No permit is needed for camping at provincial parks however camping fees will apply.

You do not need a permit if you:

  • rent a camping unit (e.g., tent, trailer, etc.) from a person who conducts business in Ontario
  • or your spouse own property in Ontario
  • carry out duties as part of employment in Canada
  • stay on watercraft equipped for overnight accommodation, anchored over provincial Crown land covered by water (stays are limited to 21 days)
  • are a charitable or non-profit group that is authorized by the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry to camp (to confirm eligibility, call 1-855-613-4256 well in advance of your trip)

The cost for a permit is $9.35 + tax per person per day.

They can be purchased at any participating Service Canada location in Superior Country, Online or through authorized license issuers.

Be Bear Wise

Superior Country is home to a healthy population of Black Bears. Encounters with bears in our region is extremely rare and by following a few simple guidelines you can remain safe.

Limit food opportunities – Garbage in containers, Food stuffs should not be left in accessible areas IE tents, porches, cabins or vehicles with open windows/unlocked doors (yes bears can open doors – or make their own).

Make Noise – Talk, whistle, play the harmonica, etc. while walking on trails, away from camp sites.

Travel in groups – Groups of two or more usually generate enough noise and deterrent to make any bears leave the area.

Bears are wild animals and should always be treated with respect. Never treat any bear as if it is tame and view from a distance.

If you encounter a bear do not make direct eye contact, do not turn your back, make noise.

Bears standing on hind legs are simply getting your sent. This is non-aggressive behavior, just curiosity.

Small charges forward with slapping the ground (false charge) is a defensive behavior and you should back away slowly without making direct eye contact.

A bear acting defensively will make alot of loud vocalizations, exhaling, chattering its teeth, huffing and moaning. They will also drop their head with ears back. This is simply defensive posturing and by either backing off slowly without making eye contact or by allowing the bear to pass by will resolve the situation.

If you witness bear cubs immediately back away the same way you came.

For more information visit – Prevent Bear encounters

Invasive Species

IN16_fbad_fishing-01

Invasive Species are on the rise in our Lakes – but boaters can help stop them

You may be surprised to learn that just taking your boat out for a spin on a neighbouring lake can help spread harmful invasive species. And that these invaders – left unchecked – can seriously harm your favorite lakes and rivers.

Fish, plants or invertebrates can be spread by humans – either on purpose or by accident – to new areas of the province. These species can become invasive, causing harm to the environment and the economy. In fact, in Ontario, the impacts from zebra mussels alone cost between $75 million and $91 million per year.

And the presence of invasive species means fewer of the types of fish you like to catch, since invasive often compete with native species, taking away their food and space or introducing parasites and diseases that harm native fish and other species.

When invasive species are introduced and get established, their numbers can increase rapidly.  Some invasive species that have already invaded Canadian waters include: zebra mussels (mussel), round goby (fish), spiny water flea (invertebrate), Eurasian watermilfoil (aquatic plant) and the rusty crayfish.

Invasive species are among the leading causes of native fish and other aquatic species being threatened or endangered, and they negatively affect global biodiversity, economies and human health around the world.

How to stop the spread of these invaders

Here are five steps boaters can take to make sure they are not spreading invasive species to new areas:

  1. Inspect your boat, motor, trailer, and boating equipment (anchors and fishing gear, centerboards, rollers and axles). Remove any zebra mussels and other animals and plants that are visible before leaving any water body.
  2. Drain water from the motor, live well, bilge and transom before leaving any water body.
  3. Wash or dry your boat, tackle, downriggers, trailer, and other boating equipment to kill harmful species that were not visible at the boat launch. Some aquatic species can survive out of water for long periods of time. Therefore, it is important to either:
  • Rinse your boat and equipment that normally gets wet with hot tap water (greater than 50°C), or
  • Spray your boat and trailer with high pressure water (>250 psi), or
  • Dry your boat and equipment in the sun for at least five days before transporting them to another body of water.
  1. Empty your bait bucket on land 30 metres away from the water. Never release bait into water, or release aquatic animals from one water body into another. It is illegal to use gobies, ruffe or rudd for bait.
  2. You can report sightings of invasive species by calling the Invading Species Hotline at 1-800-563-7711 or by emailing info@invadingspecies.com. You can also use the EDDMapS Ontario system to report sightings through your computer or smartphone.

Join in the fight against invasive species and protect your great outdoors. Learn more at Ontario.ca/InvasionON.

 

GOOD BETTER BEST
Clean, Drain Clean, Drain, Dry Clean, Drain, Disinfect
ü Clean off all visible mud, vegetation and other debrisü Pull and store the Drain plug, lower your outboard to drain standing water and drain live wells before leaving the launch In addition to cleaning and draining:ü Dry your boat and equipment in hot or sunny weather for 2-7 days before transporting them to another body of water

 

ü Use a pressure washer to spray off your boat and trailer (250psi) OR rinse off your boat and trailer with hot water (greater than 50°C)ü To prevent the spread of viral hemorrhagic septicemia, rinse live wells with 10% household bleach/water solution (i.e. 100ml of bleach to 1L water). Rinse well with water to remove any residual chlorine

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